Monday, 7 September 2015

Beneath the Surface Lies by Colin Hudson

Review copy given by author in exchange for a candid review.

'God forgive me. I did it.'

I wouldn't personally consider this as a really good book, but I definitely can all it a good one. I believe this book could have been written better, but I can assure you that the author has indeed got the potential to write.

Harris Anderson goes on a vacation to scatter his dead wife's ashes, but to his adversity, he gets go the middle of a murder. He meets a friend, Smith, who had come with his wife at his hotel. One day, Harris discovers Smith's wife drowned, her face nibbled by the fishes in the depths of the ocean.

'You owe me Harris. You got me into this mess, you've got to help me to get out of it.'


Smith is arrested for the murder, and he refuses to stay put; he immediately asks to meet Harris. He then tells Harris that he hadn't murdered his wife, and he had to get him out since he was a lawyer - albeit Harris tried to argue by pointing out that he was a construction lawyer. It was in this chaos that Harris met Inez, a girl ten years younger than him. It didn't take them too long to realize that they were in love.

This book reminds me very much of John Grisham. It is the same in his books as well: A lawyer gets caught in a crime case. Fortunately, here it isn't the stereotype of a lawyer;a construction lawyer is nice for a change.

I can't say only positive points here. Honestly, towards the end, it got a little monotonous. And them there were those typical romance scenes. If not Harris, it was Pakwaan's mundane scenes with Molly and Sue. In addition to this, I wouldn't say the names were nice. Towards the end, everything began to go fast, so that was a little galling.

Moving back to positive critique, this book definitely is good at giving shocks. Sometimes, people or unexpected events just come out of the blue, and this catches the attention of the reader.

Though this book wouldn't be go the list of books I recommend, I'd still say that the book is indeed recommend for pleasure reading.

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